Veterans Day Salute

To My Fellow Veterans, I Salute You.

Thank you for answering the call to serve our country and for all you have sacrificed to keep our flag free and secure. While our reasons for joining the military may vary, we all share one thing – love of country and the willingness to defend her.

As a Veteran who now owns and operates his own business, I value the discipline instilled in me that has allowed me to persevere, overcome and achieve even that which seems unlikely. My military experience has honed my appreciation for loyalty, faithfulness, and integrity; the very core elements of my business today. Through this journey, I have discovered a resiliency, an ability to grab deep within me and drive on. The military is family and we support one another. Had I my career to do over, I wouldn’t change a thing.

I am proud to now serve those who serve our nation. There are many ways we can all serve and pay tribute to our Veterans. Here are just a few:

Listen

Every Veteran has a story. Ask to hear it.

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Volunteer

Give of your time to serve those who served our country.

Organizations like the DAV offer a wide range of opportunities for individuals who want to make good on the commitment we’ve given our nation’s heroes.


Fly the Flag

flag


Thank the Veterans in your life

Send an email. Pick up the phone. Change your Facebook Status to honor veterans on Veterans Day. There are countless ways to say thank you. Choose one…it will make a difference, trust me.

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Support a Veteran-owned business

 

 

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Tin Hut BBQ is a Disabled American Veteran Owned & Family Operated BBQ Business serving up some of the best smoked BBQ in Hawaii to our Military Service-Members, local communities, local businesses, organizations and many other specialty type events.  Navigate our site and come visit us.  You’ll be glad you did.

 

 

Where to Find A Commercial or Commissary Kitchen for Your Food Truck

This Article is Part of the Series, “Are You Ready to Start a Food Truck Business?”

A Small Business Series of Articles for Food Truck and Mobile Catering Entrepreneurs


How Do You Find A Kitchen That Will Work for Your Food Truck or Catering Operation?

If you search for a kitchen on your own and decide to lease kitchen space from a school, a church or other establishment; ensure that the appropriate credentials have been issued from the local or state government.  Some of these may including zoning, fire and health certifications. The advantage, especially for smaller operations, is that many times you can negotiate cost by agreeing to provide an occasional catering.

What About Sharing Commissary Kitchen Space?

There are many opinions on shared commissary kitchen space, but ultimately the decision will be based on budget constraints and your expertise in owning/operating a commissary support kitchen.

Some of the challenges faced include the inability to control how others use or treat your shared equipment and prep space. Usually, we take better care of those things we have worked hard to buy, as opposed to those things we simply “acquire.”

How we treat an asset that was purchased with our own hard-earned money may not be the way another person takes care of it.  In a kitchen where equipment owned by one party is shared by another, there needs to be a clear understanding of how that equipment is to be handled, cleaned, and stored.

 

Over the years I’ve learned a few things about choosing a commissary kitchen and who I’ll share it with:

  1. Don’t be hasty to judge:  Keep in mind that “bigger” doesn’t always translate to “better.” Choosing to share space and equipment with another food truck’s crew based solely on popularity or the size of their operation can be a mistake. Whenever possible, try to visit your potential “roommates” at their current kitchen. Note how they treat their equipment – and one another. If possible, talk to other food trucks who have worked with them in the past.
  2. Consider the truck’s business practices before agreeing to share space: Another crew’s bad habits, such as improperly handling or storing food, can result in an unsafe kitchen for all. It also violates food protection guidelines, putting your very operation at risk, and reduces the space available to conduct your own operations. Having to constantly sanitize because you are unsure what is lurking on shared tables and equipment will quickly escalate your labor costs.
  3. Know the minimal space you need to operate effectively: Smaller commissary kitchens can be a challenge for a number of reasons. If there are multiple businesses using the kitchen and the space isn’t adequate, it can encroach on the time you need to complete your work.  If you operate on a set schedule that is tight in the first place, you many not have the prep time needed for a last-minute catering.

If you have to leave out cookware or equipment because there is no space in the kitchen to store it, others may have a tendency to use them without permission.  This can be a great challenge when you are looking for a piece of equipment – a scale or knife – only to and find that it is missing or broken.

In conclusion, money talks. If you are short on capital, then a shared kitchen makes sense. However, your business plan should ensure the eventual lease or build-out of a commercial kitchen that will act as YOUR commissary kitchen. You can still share it with others, but in the role of kitchen manger you’ll be able to control space and manage the kitchen effectively, as well as offset your expenses with the additional revenue.

While they’re not always easy, I am thankful for life’s experiences and lessons in self-sufficiency. In the words of  John Maxwell, “In life, the question is not if you will have problems, but how you are going to deal with your problems…The more you do, the more you fail. The more you fail, the more you learn. The more you learn, the better you get. [You will fail] but always fail forward!”


In this series of articles, Tin Hut BBQ and Aloha Gourmet Food Trucks Hawaii Founder and Pitmaster, Frank Diaz, (full bio here) addresses the scope of owning and operating a mobile cuisine and catering business including:

  • Finding a commercial or commissary kitchen to support your mobile food truck or catering operation.
  • How to write a mobile catering business plan
  • Tips for cultivating, training, and motivate a team
  • Choosing a theme for your food truck or mobile catering business
  • Food Truck and catering menu design tips
  • How to book successful catering events
  • How to improve your bottom line by avoiding a few rookie mistakes
  • Courting investors, vetting vendors, and securing all the necessary licenses and permits required to operate a food truck or catering business
  • Going mobile, from brick and mortar to food truck

Readers can reach out with the questions and topics you’d like to see covered. Simply email Frank at TinHut_BBQ@yahoo.com and we may feature your topic or respond to your question in a subsequent article.

 

 

Commercial or Commissary Kitchen Requirements for your Food Truck Operation

This Article is Part of the Series, “Are You Ready to Start a Food Truck Business?”

A Small Business Series of Articles for Food Truck and Mobile Catering Entrepreneurs


 

Finding a commercial or commissary kitchen to support your mobile food truck or catering operation is one of the focal points one must consider when developing a business plan for your food truck or catering operation.

So, what exactly is a Commissary or Commercial Kitchen, you ask, and what type of space and equipment will yours need?

A COMMERCIAL KITCHEN  is located inside of a brick and mortar structure (a building) which incorporates cooking stations and appropriate equipment to operate the stations. The type of cuisine offered by the restaurant or food truck, as well as the philosophy and preparation techniques of the restaurant’s head chef, determine the focus and the number of the stations present in a commercial kitchen (as well as the type of equipment the kitchen should have). The physical size of the restaurant or food truck, (concept and operation) is also taken into consideration when determining the type of commercial equipment and appliances selected for the kitchen. Commercial kitchens typically include much larger spaces (stations) than traditional residential kitchens.

A COMMISSARY KITCHEN is a commercial kitchen that is used to conduct the necessary food operations for a mobile cuisine, such as food truck, mobile catering, food tents, kiosk, food carts or concession trailers.   Food operations includes prep, cooking, dishwashing, parking food trucks, filling water supply on truck, draining grey water from truck, storage of raw food supplies and more.

A commissary kitchen is simply a commercial kitchen that effectively supports your mobile cuisine from the prep stages of your business to the clean-up.

What should your kitchen have?

Equipment and Space for Food Preparation: Based on your current concept or specific menu, your search begins with finding a kitchen that has the adequate equipment and space needed to prep your food for the truck.

  1. For example, if you will be serving pasta in your daily venue, then you will want to ensure that the kitchen you use has the equipment capability of boiling your water/pasta, a prep sink large enough to drain/rinse pasta, workbench to prepare your pasta, then possibly an oven to bake the pasta dish, and finally a separate work area to store or hold your food transport containers or a steam table to keep pasta warm until departure.
  2. You will have to look at the entire prep process for your menu and determine all the equipment you will need and also if some task need to be completed simultaneously or incrementally.  While a compromise of equipment may occur initially, the long term effects may be felt as the business grows.
  3. While we have mainly been considering appliances at this point, when developing your plan and finding a commissary kitchen don’t forget about considering a budget towards the purchase of misc and essential cookware and other prep/cooking equipment.  Will the commissary kitchen come with a supply of cookware or do you have to supply your own.  If you provided you own, where can it be stored?
    • What is the condition of the equipment? Is it greasy, not cleaned thoroughly? These are concerns of many health departments, usually grease stains are indicative of food residue that has been cooked on in one form or another. Is the equipment cleaned to your standards or better?  When I look for a kitchen and it has equipment I immediately look beneath, behind and on the sides to see what level of cleaning is done.  I don’t want to spend time cleaning someone else’s mess especially in a shared kitchen.
    • Consider whether the equipment be available each time you use kitchen or do you have to share equipment? Sharing a kitchen brings challenges all in its own and may be discussed in the segment or a future segment of Starting a Mobile Cuisine Business.

Storage: Once you’ve determined that the kitchen has adequate kitchen space for you to prepare your food, consider other requirements of your mobile cuisine. For example, will you be purchasing your food daily for prep prior to departing for your venue or will maintain an ample supply of perishable/dry products for prep.  This requirement now generates multiple levels of support needed.  If you are producing meat or fish products daily; you may need refrigeration or freezer support.  If you have canned or other dry goods then you may need dry storage space with shelves to store your foods, spices or other ingredients. The volume you anticipate using determines the equipment size of the coolers you will need.

Things to consider:

  1. Will your mobile cuisine have catering capabilities? Will you have equipment on hand, such as chaffing dishes, serving utensils, or will you be using rental equipment? Or will you have both? Do you need dollies or other transport carts to load your equipment? Depending on the level of catering you desire to provide, storage space of your catering supplies may be necessary.
  2. What requirements does your food truck have? Will you need a fresh water supply or a waste water dump? How about your daily trash and leftover food? Most health departments will require your business to answer these questions, therefore it is important that your commissary kitchen meets the requirements to support these requirements.  Some states may even require a specialize hose for fresh water and the state’s waste management department may require grease or waste water dumped in specific dump stations with grease traps or other filtration systems that protect the environment.  Water is not limited to just your fresh water supply, you will also need to maintain the cleanliness of your vehicle, therefore assess if the commissary kitchen has the capability to support that operation or if you can fulfill that need by taking the vehicle to a remote cleaning site.

When searching for a commissary kitchen consider the type of commercial equipment needed for prep, dry storage space, and refrigeration/freezer needs.

 

Follow this link to learn where to find a commercial or commissary kitchen for your food truck…


In this series of articles, Tin Hut BBQ and Aloha Gourmet Food Trucks Hawaii Founder and Pitmaster, Frank Diaz, (full bio here) addresses the scope of owning and operating a mobile cuisine and catering business including:

  • Finding a commercial or commissary kitchen to support your mobile food truck or catering operation.
  • How to write a mobile catering business plan
  • Tips for cultivating, training, and motivate a team
  • Choosing a theme for your food truck or mobile catering business
  • Food Truck and catering menu design tips
  • How to book successful catering events
  • How to improve your bottom line by avoiding a few rookie mistakes
  • Courting investors, vetting vendors, and securing all the necessary licenses and permits required to operate a food truck or catering business
  • Going mobile, from brick and mortar to food truck

Readers can reach out with the questions and topics you’d like to see covered. Simply email Frank at TinHut_BBQ@yahoo.com and we may feature your topic or respond to your question in a subsequent article.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Are You Ready to Start a Food Truck Business?

A Small Business Series of Articles for Food Truck and Mobile Catering Entrepreneurs


From articles and interviews with celebrity chefs, break-out food truck stars and well-travelled street food bloggers to faceless food truck catering booking services, you’ll find plenty of “expert” opinions on what a successful food truck or catering business looks like. But you have to ask yourself, what do they know

Clearly they know what it takes to succeed in their areas of expertise, or they wouldn’t be where they are today. But are they subject matter experts in the area of mobile catering? Do they possess first hand knowledge about building a successful food truck business from the ground up?

I’ve had the privilege of meeting and working with executive chefs from some of the world’s most exclusive restaurants, master chefs, celebrity chefs, corporate chefs, nationally televised food-truck competition winners, and any number of talented cooks and pit masters.  With hundreds of years of experience between us, we can all agree upon one fact:  just because you are a talented chef or possess the skills to craft amazing recipes, doesn’t mean you have the chops to go into business for yourself.

Being a successful entrepreneur and business owner means arming yourself with a good business plan and surrounding yourself with an inner circle of skilled professionals – or at a minimum folks who share your passion and vision for the business you are about to embark upon. Those two determining factors, combined with a keen understanding of your own strengths and weaknesses will go far in cultivating success in your business endeavor.

I jumped aboard the mobile cuisine bandwagon in 2012 and have enjoyed a successful career, thanks to a crew of superstars, a management team I can rely on, and a close circle of friends and advisors whose counsel I seek regularly.  After a 34 year career of Military and Civilian Federal Government experience as a soldier, community planner, operations officer, and Antiterrorism Specialist, I have been blessed with this opportunity to follow my dream.

As an entrepreneur, I started a food truck business from scratch, building it into a successful multi-truck, multi-location restaurant and catering business in Hawaii, including Aloha Gourmet Food Trucks of Hawaii, Aloha Gourmet Burgers, a soon-to-be-launched, not yet named Fried Chicken Food Truck, and our multi-truck flagship Tin Hut BBQ – just voted Hawaii’s Best Food Truck for 2017 by the Honolulu Star-Advertiser.

 

Statistics show that the Food Truck business, which currently generates more than $2.7 billion a year in revenue, is growing at a rate of 3.5%, which is good, but it should be noted that this is down from the 7.9% enjoyed by the industry in the recent past. This can be attributed to a number of factors including increased competition, lower profit margins, increase in regulatory hurdles, or changes in health department requirements.

One could also argue (and it’s my opinion) that too many new business owners are jumping into the popular food truck arena without the experience, knowledge, and most important, a well-thought-out, rehearsed, and carefully executed business plan – the very foundation of any successful business.

As a seasoned subject matter expert on starting and operating a food truck, I will address the scope of owning and operating a mobile cuisine and catering business through a series of articles about topics that matter to a mobile catering entrepreneur, including:

  • Finding a commercial or commissary kitchen to support your mobile food truck or catering operation. (click to see article)
  • How to write a mobile catering business plan
  • Tips for cultivating, training, and motivate a team
  • Choosing a theme for your food truck or mobile catering business
  • Food Truck and catering menu design tips
  • How to book successful catering events
  • How to improve your bottom line by avoiding a few rookie mistakes
  • Courting investors, vetting vendors, and securing all the necessary licenses and permits required to operate a food truck or catering business
  • Going mobile, from brick and mortar to food truck

I invite readers to reach out with the questions and topics you’d like to see covered. Simply email me at TinHut_BBQ@yahoo.com and I may feature your topic or respond to your question in a subsequent article.

About Frank

Leading the innovative culinary team at Tin Hut BBQ and Aloha Gourmet Food Trucks Hawaii is Owner/Founder and Pitmaster, Frank Diaz,  retired  U.S. Army veteran-turned D.O.D. Antiterrorism Specialist.

Diaz’ concept – to provide diverse, cultural cuisine from the best food trucks in Hawaii – allows customers to bring gourmet food trucks to their events with the click of a button.

Read full bio and learn more about Tin Hut BBQ and Aloha Gourmet Food Trucks here…

4th of July BBQ

Every year the United State’s of America celebrates her official birthday on the Fourth of July. Independence Day is a day of traditions including fireworks, parades, fairs, patriotic songs, concerts in the park, picnics… and of course our favorite… barbeque!!!

Five Fun Facts about Barbecue:

  1. Barbecues have been a White House tradition since Thomas Jefferson. Lyndon B. Johnson, the 36th president of the United States, hosted the first barbecue at the White House that featured Texas-style barbecued ribs.
  2. The most popular holidays for barbecuing are, in order, July 4th (71 percent), Memorial Day (57 percent), and Labor Day (55 percent)..
  3. The most popular foods for cooking on the grill are, in order: burgers (85 percent), steak (80 percent), hot dogs (79 percent) and chicken (73 percent).
  4. The side dishes most commonly prepared on the grill are, in order, corn (41 percent), potatoes (41 percent), and other vegetables (32 percent).
  5. The most popular flavors of barbecue sauce are hickory, followed by mesquite, honey, and then spicy-hot.

Shared via foodimentary.com

Must-Share Recipe by Our Friend Myron Mixon

Captain America Burger

Favorite BBQ Side Dishes

here


4th of July Playlist

Next to fireworks and barbeque, there is no better way to celebrate our nation’s birthday than reveling in one of these musical tributes to the good ol’ U.S.A!

You’ll love this amazing “America Medley” by Anthem Lights

For more of this playlist, click here

 


The Sauce

Barbeque sauces vary from region to region, from pitmaster to pitmaster, from user to user, each with a different opinion on which is best and whether the sauce should complement the meat or complete it. But whether BBQ competitor or restaurateur, each master has a finishing sauce of his or her own.

We at Tin Hut BBQ believe that , as with our Steaks, the sauce should be a compliment to the meat and the meat should be properly seasoned with the basic rubs during the smoking process.  Of course, when creating the BBQ sauce we ensure that the appropriate seasonings are added so that it complements the meat, enhancing – never hiding the flavor of the meat.

Read More Here

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Safety

Heading out to the grill? Check out this infographic by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics first! From safety tips for your cookout to proper cooking temperatures and a complete packing list, these tips will ensure a safe BBQ for your family and friends!



 

 

 

4 Of Our Favorite Grilled Cheese Sandwich Recipes

Grilled Cheese is an American classic. In honor of this quintessential comfort food, we are putting the spotlight on four of our favorite Grilled Cheese Sandwich recipes along with a bonus recipe our fans won’t want to miss!

4-Cheese Grilled Cheese


Bacon Jalapeno Grilled Cheese

 


Buffalo Chicken Grilled Cheese


Mac & Cheese Grilled Cheese


SGT Tin Hut shares the secret to his popular Grilled Cheese & Pulled Pork Sandwich with Recipe & How-To Instructions

 

People often ask Tin Hut BBQ founder/owner Frank Diaz how he makes his popular grilled cheese concoction, and he is only too happy to share his technique:

Ingredients:

  • ½ Cup of Tin Hut BBQ’s Creamy Butter Mix
  • 8 slices Medium Cheddar Cheese
  • 4 slices Muenster Cheese (Tip: Havarti is a good substitute for the Ooey & Gooey texture)
  • 12 ozs Pulled Pork, Tin Hut Style (We use a Cookshack smoker)
  • Tin Hut’s BBQ Sauce
  • 8 slices of Jumbo Bread (Tin Hut BBQ use Loves Jumbo Sandwich Bread)
  • Squeeze bottle with water
  • Hot Griddle temp 375 degrees F

Read More…


 

BBQ Grilled Cheese, Grilled Cheese Sandwiches, Food Truck Grilled Cheese, Tin Hut BBQ, Hawaii Food Trucks, Hawaii Catering, April is Grilled Cheese Month, National Grilled Cheese Month

Ham and Cheese Casserole

Ham is to Easter what turkey is to Thanksgiving. Not only is it a main dish, it’s also the main ingredient in a number of favorite holiday recipes like this one for Ham and Cheese Casserole.

 

Ham and Cheese Casserole Ingredients: 8 oz of Pasta Noodles (bow-tie or penne) ¼ cup butter ½ Teaspoon granulated garlic ½ teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon pepper ½ teaspoon dry mustard 1 cup milk 1 cup of half and half

2 ½ cups of Colby jack cheese (cubed) ¼ cup of cheddar cheese ¼ cup of flour (all purpose) 2 cups of smoked ham

Instructions

1. Smoke ham according to the recipe shared via Cook Shack (Tin Hut BBQ’s preferred smoker) in our article “5 Easter Dishes You Can Grill, Smoke, or BBQ”

2. Preheat oven to 350 3. Boil pasta noodles for about 13 minutes. I add a teaspoon of salt and a tablespoon of olive oil to the water.

4. In a large saucepan over medium heat melt butter and sauté garlic for about 30 seconds (careful not to burn). Add flour and stir with a whisk, add salt and pepper.

5. Pour in milk a little at a time, stirring constantly

6. Bring mixture to a boil for 1 minute.

7. Stir in dry mustard

8. Add Colby jack cheese

9. Continue to cook, stirring until cheese is melted

10. Remove from heat, stir in pasta and ham

11. Pour into a baking dish, sprinkle with cheddar cheese

12. Bake 20-25 minutes until bubbly and golden.

 

 

 

Find more Easter Recipes in our article “5 Easter Dishes You Can Grill, Smoke, or BBQ”

Tin Hut BBQ is Oahu’s Premiere BBQ Catering Company

We provide catering services for any size party, from Military Celebrations and Ceremonies, Seated Wedding Dinners, Elegant Parties, and Corporate Events to Baby’s First Birthday, Fundraisers and Backyard BBQs.

 Hawaii Catering, Best BBQ Hawaii, Hawaii Military Catering

Carolina Style BBQ Sauce: Another Barbeque Sauce Style Featured Recipe

As we know, each of the various BBQ regions lays claim to its own style of BBQ sauce and the Carolinas are no exception. While Western Carolina Style sauces  similar to KC Style and Texas Styles in that they are tomato based, they are comprised primarily of ketchup with lots of vinegar and sugar, resembling a sweet-and-sour sauce more than it’s western counterparts. Eastern Style sauces are vinegar based, with sugar, crushed red peppers, salt and pepper for flavor, while South Carolina sauces are where the mustard based sauces originate from.

Tin Hut BBQ’s Carolina BBQ Sauce is a nice blend of these regional styles: 

The Ingredients you’ll need are:

Brown sugar, 1/2 cup packed

Granulated garlic, 2 teaspoons

Salt, 2 teaspoons

Black pepper, 1 teaspoon

Crushed red pepper, 1 teaspoon

White pepper,  ½ teaspoon

Cayenne, ¼ teaspoon

Fresh lemon juice, 1/3 cup

White vinegar, ¼ cup

Apple cidar, ¼ cup

Worcestershire sauce, 1 tablespoon

Molasses, ¼ cup

Prepared yellow mustard, 2 cups

 

Instructions

After combining all dry ingredients in a large bowl, add lemon juice, vinegar, apple cider and Worcestershire sauce then blend well with a wire whisk. Add molasses and mustard to the mix (hint: use a food processor or blender).  This makes an excellent finishing sauce for pork butts; start applying about 1 hour prior to the end of cooking, then again 30 minutes later. The sauce is also perfect for warming up to compliment  pulled pork on a sandwich or by itself.



Learn how to make Tin Hut BBQ’s popular recipe for Raspberry-Chipotle BBQ Sauce right here…

Want to experiment with your own BBQ Sauces? Our friends over at Cookshack have a few suggestions:

 

BBQ Food Truck and Catering | Hawaii Military Catering | Honolulu Catering | Oahu weddings and special events | Tin Hut BBQ is a Disabled Veteran owned business

 

Barbecue, BBQ, Barbeque, Food Trucks, Catering, Foodtruck, Pulled Pork, BBQ Smokers, BBQ Sauces, Barbecue Sauce, Barbeque Sauce, BBQ Chicken, BBQ Ribs, Catering Services, Smoked Brisket, Smoked Ribs, Smoking Ribs, bbq recipe

National Medal of Honor Day

National Medal of Honor Day, celebrated on March 25, is dedicated to all Medal of Honor recipients.

The first Medals of Honor were presented March 25, 1863, when Secretary of War, Edwin Stanton presented Medals of Honor (Army) to six members of  “Andrews Raiders” for their volunteering and participation during an American Civil War raid in April of 1862.

The Medal of honor is the highest military honor in the United States of America and is awarded by the President of the United States, in the name of Congress, to US military personnel for personal acts of valor above and beyond the call of duty.Three versions of the Medal of Honor exist, including one for the Army, one for the Air Force, and one for the Navy, which is also awarded to Marine Corps and the Coast Guard.

Since its creation, there have been 3,468 Medals of Honor awarded to the country’s soldiers, sailors, airmen, Marines and coast guardsmen.

To observe National Medal of Honor Day, use #MedalOfHonorDay to post on social media.

Tin Hut BBQ and Aloha Gourmet Food Trucks founder and U.S. Veteran Frank Diaz is pictured here with Medal of Honor Recipient Chuck Hagemeister.

Charles “Chuck” Chris Hagemeister (born August 21, 1946) is a retired United States Army officer and a recipient of the United States military’s highest decoration—the Congressional Medal of Honor—for his actions in the Vietnam War.

 

Specialist Hagemeister’s Medal of Honor citation reads:

“For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty. Read more…

 

 

 

See more American heroes on Tin Hut BBQ’s Honor Wall

BBQ Food Truck and Catering | Hawaii Military Catering | Honolulu Catering | Oahu weddings and special events | Tin Hut BBQ is a Disabled Veteran owned business

Barbecue, BBQ, Barbeque, Food Trucks, Catering, Foodtruck, Pulled Pork, BBQ Smokers, BBQ Sauces, Barbecue Sauce, Barbeque Sauce, BBQ Chicken, BBQ Ribs, Catering Services, Smoked Brisket, Smoked Ribs, Smoking Ribs, bbq recipe

Barbeque Sauce Styles and Featured Recipe: Tin Hut BBQ’s Raspberry-Chipotle BBQ Sauce

Barbeque sauces vary from region to region, from pitmaster to pitmaster, from user to user, each with a different opinion on which is best and whether the sauce should complement the meat or complete it. But whether BBQ competitor or restaurateur, each master has a finishing sauce of his or her own.

We at Tin Hut BBQ believe that , as with our Steaks, the sauce should be a compliment to the meat and the meat should be properly seasoned with the basic rubs during the smoking process.  Of course, when creating the BBQ sauce we ensure that the appropriate seasonings are added so that it complements the meat, enhancing – never hiding – the taste.

As we know, each of the various BBQ regions lays claim to its own style of BBQ sauce. Kansas City style sauces are tomato based, sweet and spicy, some with a bite.  In general, KC sauces are thicker than most other regional styles.

Texas Sauces are also tomato-based, but with a thinner and less sweet composition, generally with more molasses and Worcestershire sauce to give it the distinction.  Western Carolina Style sauces are similar to KC Style and Texas Styles in that they are tomato based. comprised primarily of ketchup with lots of vinegar and sugar, Carolina Style more resembles a sweet-and-sour sauce than it’s western counterparts. Eastern Style sauces are vinegar based, with sugar, crushed red peppers, salt and pepper for flavor, while South Carolina and Georgia sauces are where the mustard based sauces originate from.

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This week Tin Hut BBQ is sharing its popular recipe for:

Raspberry-Chipotle BBQ Sauce

Ingredients:

10 ozs Fresh or frozen Raspberries (fresh is best)

3 tablespoons Fresh Lemon Juice

1 teaspoon of salt

1 ½ cups of sugar

¼ cup brown sugar

¼ cup white vinegar

2 tablespoons of chili powder

2 teaspoons of chipotle paste or powder

2 teaspoons of black pepper

1 teaspoon of ground allspice

½ teaspoon of ground ginger

¼ teaspoon of ground cloves

 

Instructions

  1. Place raspberries, lemon juice, and salt in a food processor, mix until smooth
  2. Strain if necessary to remove seeds. (will not be harmful with them)
  3. Pour mixture into a medium size saucepan and stir in sugar.
  4. Cook at medium heat until sugar is dissolved
  5. Simmer for 30 minutes stirring occasionally
  6. Add remaining ingredients to raspberry mixture.
  7. Mix and simmer for 20-30 minutes.

Mix should yield two 18 oz bottles or about 40 ozs.

The Raspberry Chipotle Sauce is sweet and spicy and awesome on Brisket and compliments the pulled pork enhancing it’s natural flavor.

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The following Regional BBQ Sauce Styles Infographic from Man Crates illustrates the basic formulas that each of these barbeque styles are known for:

 

Tin Hut BBQ is Oahu’s Premiere BBQ Catering Company

We provide catering services for any size party, from Military Celebrations and Ceremonies, Seated Wedding Dinners, Elegant Parties, and Corporate Events to Baby’s First Birthday, Fundraisers and Backyard BBQs.

Click here to BOOK NOW!

 

BBQ Food Truck and Catering | Hawaii Military Catering | Honolulu Catering | Oahu weddings and special events | Tin Hut BBQ is a Disabled Veteran owned business

Barbecue, BBQ, Barbeque, Food Trucks, Catering, Foodtruck, Pulled Pork, BBQ Smokers, BBQ Sauces, Barbecue Sauce, Barbeque Sauce, BBQ Chicken, BBQ Ribs, Catering Services, Smoked Brisket, Smoked Ribs, Smoking Ribs, bbq recipe